Oral health and general health. Are they connected to each other?

Believe it or not, the link between our oral health and our general health is very strong. By simply having a  look in your mouth, your dentist will be able to tell if there is something wrong with your body. That is because our mouth is the gateway to an amazing  system: the human body. By taking care of your mouth, teeth and gums you can help prevent a lot of health problems, such as heart disease, respiratory infections, diabet complications, dementia.

There are two main types of dental diseases: gum (periodontal) disease and tooth decay (dental caries, more commonly known as cavities). Gum disease is an infection of the tissues that support the teeth and is a major cause of tooth loss in adults.

Tooth decay is caused by the action of dental plaque on the teeth when food and drinks containing sugar are consumed. Plaque and sugar together produce acid, which attacks the tooth, causing decay. An untreated decay will lead to major problems.

Let’s see together the connection between each of these general health problems and dental problems.

Heart disease

Researchers have found a strong correlation between gum disease and heart disease. One hypothesis is that bacteria from the oral cavity spread throughout the body, worsening other inflammatory conditions, like heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis and type 2 diabetes.

Diabet

Inflammation of the gum tissue and periodontal disease can make it harder to control your blood sugar and make your diabetes symptoms worse. Research shows that there is an increased prevalence of gum disease among those with diabetes.

Respiratory infections

Gum disease could cause you to get infections in your lungs, including pneumonia. New research suggests bacteria from gum disease travel through airways and into the lungs. And this may lead to potentially life-threatening respiratory illnesses such as pneumonia. Periodontal disease may increase the risk for respiratory infections.

Dementia

The bacteria from gingivitis may enter the brain through either nerve channels in the head or through the bloodstream, that might even lead to the development of Alzheimer’s disease.

Now that you have an idea about what poor oral care may cause, you should know that regular healthy habits can lower your risk of general health problems. In order to avoid them, there are some strategies for you:

  • First of all, brush and floss regularly. To remove plaque-forming bacteria, brush for at least two minutes, twice a day, don’t skip the floss and use a mouth rinse to kill bacteria.
  • Secondly, we strongly recommend you to eat a BALANCED DIET and limit unhealthy snacks. Lack of nutrients and calcium leads to tooth decay and gum disease.
  • And finally VISIT your dentist REGULARLY, for professionals cleanings and oral examinations. Give him all the information related to your medical history and any medications you are taking.Our general health is connected with our oral health. A poor oral health can kill you. By not going to the dentist and not taking care of your teeth, you surely neglect your overall body. And the consequences may be really bad. So take care of your teeth in order to prevent diseases such as heart disease and dementia. If you already suffer from one of these diseases, do the same in order not to get worse.

Conclusion

Our general health is connected with our oral health. A poor oral health can kill you. By not going to the dentist and not taking care of your teeth, you surely neglect your overall body. And the consequences may be really bad. So take care of your teeth in order to prevent diseases such as heart disease and dementia. If you already suffer from one of these diseases, do the same in order not to get worse. For any additional clarifications, Dr Arhiri can help you :610.647-7611 or drarhiri@premiersmilespa.com.

For healthy living and for healthy teeth and gums, think before you eat and drink. It’s not only what you eat but when you eat that can affect your dental health (if you are on a special diet, keep your physician’s advice in mind when choosing foods):

References:

1.http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/DataStatistics/SurgeonGeneral/sgr/chap5.htm

2.http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/DataStatistics/SurgeonGeneral/sgr/part3.htm

3.http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/features/oral-health-the-mouth-body-connection#1

4.https://www.unitedconcordia.com/docs/Oral_Wellness_Series_Oral_and_Overall_Health.pdf

5.https://www.deltadentalins.com/oral_health/heart.html

6.http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/treatment-and-care/oral-health-and-hygiene/

7.http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/h/heart-disease-and-oral-health

8.https://www.unitedconcordia.com/dental-insurance/dental-health/conditions/respiratory-disease-oral-health/

9.https://www.perio.org/consumer/healthy-lungs

10.http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/conditions/gum-disease/article/how-poor-dental-care-can-affect-your-overall-health-0313

 

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