Did you know that there are some bad drinks for your teeth? Let’s find out more about it!

The drinks you consume can have bad impact on your oral health. The effect the beverages have on your teeth depends upon a lot of factors, the most important being the acidity of the drinks. Anything that measures 5.5 or less on the pH scale is considered acidic. A repetead exposure to high levels of acid can cause tooth erosion. Tooth erosion occurs when acids dissolves the enamel (the hard tissues of the tooth). Beverages affect the health of your teeth but also their color.

  1. Sparkling water

    – studies have shown that sparkling water tends to have a pH level of 2.74 and 3.34, which means that it is worse that orange juice because it has a greater erosive potential.

  1. Coffee and tea

    – caffeine increases the process of tooth erosion by reducing the saliva production. If consuming coffee, make sure you drink plenty of water in order to keep your mouth hydrated afterwards. Chewing gum is also recommended in order to increase saliva production in your mouth. Saliva washes away acids and plaque from your teeth. According to the American Dental Association , chewing sugarless gum for 20 minutes after eating can help prevent tooth decay. Coffee and teeth can also cause stains on your teeth. They contain tannins which can lead to stains on your teeth. Giving up coffee and tea is the best solution to avoid staining, but it is very difficult to do this. Rather that doing this, specialists recommend to consume our coffee at specific break times, rather than sipping throughout the day. Brushing your teeth with a whitening toothpaste and seeing your dentist for regular professional cleanings are the best way to prevent coffee stains. You can try to drink your coffee through a straw. A study published in International Journal of Dental Hygiene found that if you add milk in your coffee, your teeth will suffer less. This is because of casein, a protein in the milk.

 

  1. Wine –

    red wine is better than white wine because is less acidic. Acid can slowly erode your enamel. Sparkling wines are the worst of all alcoholic drinks, as the bubbles in them are caused by carbon dioxide, which is acidic. Red wine has also benefits for our general health. It contains antioxidants, which are known to be important in preventing diabetes, cancer, certain neurological diseases and cardiovascular degeneration. Some studies have found out that the polyphenols from red wine were the most effective in fighting the bacteria in our mouth. These bacteria can cause plaque, cavities and gum disease.

  2. Soda and fruit juice

    – studies have shown that there is no difference between regular and diet sodas regarding the damage they do to our enamel erosion. Specialists recommend us to eat the fruits instead of drinking the juice fruit. The fresh juice is more acidic.

As you may see, there are some beverages that can cause damage to your teeth. Early enamel erosion can be treated with fluoride by your dentist.
Tips for preventing enamel erosion: drink lots of water, don’t brush your teeth immediately after drinking acidic beverages, consume soft drinks, fruit juices and sport drinks through a straw, chew sugar-free gum. Talk to your dentist about a remineralising treatment (with fluoride and calcium phosphate) in order to prevent cavities.
In case you have problems with your enamel erosion or you need extra information regaarding the recommended beverages for the health of your teeth, call today to make an appointment. Dr. Arhiri is here to help.

References:

https://www.healthline.com/health/dental-oral-health/what-these-drinks-do-to-your-teeth
https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/features/the-drinks-which-erode-your-teeth-10308496.html
https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/features/foods-drink-harm-teeth#1
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2718388/How-nightly-glass-wine-wreck-teeth.html
https://www.forbes.com/sites/thomaspellechia/2018/03/05/smile-scientists-say-red-wine-may-promote-healthy-teeth/#585b915399fc
https://www.healthline.com/health-news/red-wine-can-help-protect-your-teeth#4
https://www.rd.com/health/conditions/coffee-stains-teeth/
https://crest.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/teeth-stains/tea-coffee-teeth-stains-how-to-avoid-remove-them
https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/cosmetic-dentistry/teeth-whitening/how-does-coffee-stain-teeth-0213