Did you know that there are aliments that can damage your teeth and gums? Let’s find out more about this.

If in a previous article we find out more information about the aliments that have a lot of benefits for our oral health, in this article we will discuss about the foods that can damage our teeth.

We often hear “Do not eat too many candies” or “Coffee and red wine stains your teeth”, so be careful. Tooth-damaging foods and beverages weaken our enamel, crack our crowns, change the color of our teeth and affect our mouth. This is because sugars in the foods will increase the risk of dental cavities, hard substances will destroy our teeth enamel and sodas will dry out our mouth.

Many foods and beverages can cause plaque, which is a bacteria-filled sticky film that contributes to gum disease, tooth decay and other oral health problems. Sugar creates an acidic environment in our mouth, which persists for about two hours after it is consumed. The acid dissolves tooth enamel. The ideal time to brush your teeth is twenty minutes after you ate. This is because in twenty minutes saliva has remineralized the enamel that has been dissolved by acid. Acid is what causes problems for teeth. The sugars cause the bacteria in our mouth to release acids that attack tooth’s enamel. When the enamel is destroyed, dental cavities will develop.

There is a list of foods and beverages you should avoid in order to limit at maximum the visit to your dentist.

  • Dried fruits – many dried fruits (raisins, prunes, apricots) are sticky. They her stuck in the teeth, leaving behind lots of sugar. All of its water is removed, causing the naturally present sugars to become extremely concentrated. This is the reason dried fruits are as a sticky caramel in your mouth. Make sure you rise your mouth with water after consuming them and if it is possible replace dried fruits with the fresh ones. After twenty minutes, brush your teeth and floss.
  • Peanut butter. It is very sticky and stays in contact with your teeth for a long period of time, which makes you more likely to get dental caries. If you like peanut butter, try to buy the natural one, that doesn’t contain any added sugar.
  • Pickled foods have a high concentration of acids because of the vinegars, which can demineralize your teeth. They also contain sugar which causes cavities. This is why you should eat a piece of cheese after consuming pickles or chew a sugar-free gum. It will increase saliva in your mouth and will cancel out the acids.
  • Sour candies have a high level of acidic content, which can dissolve your tooth enamel.
  • Sports drinks are acidic and the liquid can stick to your teeth for long periods of time. You can replace them with water.
  • Alcohol. It dries your mouth and reduces saliva production. This will result in tooth decay and gum disease. And it is also acidic, which means that increase the risk of teeth enamel erosion.
  • Red wine and coffee may stain your teeth. Make sure to rinse your mouth with water after consuming these liquids.

As a conclusion, be aware that a good nutrition and a well-balanced diet keep your teeth and gums healthy. A poor nutrition will always result in a bad oral health. The simplest way to protect your teeth from dental cavities is to rinse your mouth with water every time you eat something. Drinking water will wash away food particles and sugars.In case you need further information, do not hesitate to contact Dr. Arhiri. We are more than glad to help.

 

References:

 

https://www.healthline.com/health/dental-and-oral-health/worst-foods-for-your-teeth#5
https://www.womenshealthmag.com/food/a19905056/foods-bad-for-teeth/
http://www.thisisinsider.com/worst-foods-for-your-teeth-2017-10#goldfish-2
https://www.agd.org/docs/default-source/self-instruction-(gendent)/gendent_nd17_aafp_pflipsen.pdf
http://www.besthealthmag.ca/best-you/oral-health/5-foods-that-will-destroy-your-teeth/
http://www.besthealthmag.ca/best-you/oral-health/4-foods-that-are-bad-for-your-teeth/view-all/
https://www.grandparents.com/health-and-wellbeing/health/foods-bad-for-your-teeth